Weird laws in France and more newsletter!

Written by on February 2, 2020 in Newsletter from France

Bowl of French onion soup thick with cheese and bread in a Paris cafe

Bonjour

Hope you had a good week.

Here it’s been super busy as I’ve been writing my second book. But now it’s finished, gone off to the publishers for printing and will be out in the spring. So, I’m back with the weekly letters and the daily chats on Facebook (did you see it was National Croissant Day this week? I shared a croissant image on Facebook which went viral!), Twitter and Instagram. It still amazes me that I can talk to someone in America, Brazil, Japan, France, UK, Australia and Puerto Rico and just about everywhere so easily. And, I absolutely love it. Being a writer can be a lonely life but not for me – I have such a big community of friends around the world!

I’ve been studying France for a while now but I’m still fascinated, surprised and sometimes baffled by what I discover. In the lovely wine making area of Chateauneuf du Pape for instance, where the Popes once had their French summer home (who can blame them?) it’s illegal for flying saucers to fly over the town. I kid you not, this actually is a law which was created in the 1950s when some people were clearly drinking too much of the famous wine and became worried about UFOs. The Mayor organised the law to be passed and it’s still valid to this day – aliens beware!

A much more fun law is that you must eat crêpes (deliciously thin pancakes) on 2 February… Okay it’s not a law, but it ought to be! It’s the Fête de la Chandeleur, Candlemas in English, and it’s likely based on a centuries old tradition when pilgrims were offered crêpes by Pope Gelasius in the fifth century. There’s a recipe below for perfect French, very easy to make, crêpes.

Wishing you a very bon weekend.
Bisous from France.
Janine
Editor

Photo: French onion soup by Betty Hobert in honour of February 4 being National Home-Made Soup Day!

Don’t miss the weekly newsletter from the best website about France

Read the whole newsletter here 

It’s easy to subscribe if you don’t want to miss my weekly newsletters of musings from France and a roundup of fab features, plus exclusive random newsletter giveaways. Just scroll to the bottom of this post if you’re on a mobile device, or look on the right on a laptop, type in your email address and click subscribe…

Related Articles

Bon weekend from cheese and wine loving France…

Bonjour, I truly hope you and yours are well. I’ve been taking a bit of time out, which is why you’re only hearing from me every two weeks! That doesn’t mean I’m totally relaxing though as the next magazine is in progress. It’s free to subscribe to via the current issue (here), and it’s a […]

Continue Reading

Bon weekend from a lavender field in France

Bonjour, I truly hope you and yours are well. Here we’ve had a bit of a damp week which has made my 47 (eek, what was I thinking?) cucumber plants happy. My pumpkin plant now has 38 baby pumpkins growing along its sprawling vines. And 4 new chickens have joined Reggie and Ronnie Kray’s pen […]

Continue Reading

Almost normal France weekly newsletter

Some weeks I sit down to write to you and despite not travelling, it feels as if the days have whizzed past – and in other ways I feel like we are all living in limbo land with a long way to go until normality returns for everyone. But, this week there are a few […]

Continue Reading

Inspiration from France…

Bonjour, I truly hope you and yours are well. Last week I went out to dinner for the first time since February. Mark (my other half) and me went with our friends Gary and Annette (if you read my first book My Good Life in France, she’s the one who kept an abandoned, nearly ready […]

Continue Reading

Bon weekend from thundery France

Bonjour, I truly hope you and yours are well. Just as we’ve officially reached summer, the weather has gone all spring-like after months of summery skies – it’s very topsy-turvy. Plump fluffy marshmallow-like clouds frivolously cavort across the sky, sometimes followed by ominous dark clouds, in between bits of deep Wedgewood blue. Meanwhile, against my […]

Continue Reading

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Comments are closed.

Top