Uncorked by Paul Shore

Written by on May 29, 2017 in Book Reviews And Interviews

Sometimes little twists of fate can evolve into tornadoes, changing us both as a person as well as our perspective on life…

In his early thirties, Canadian Paul Shore’s technological work took him on a short business trip to the south of France. The experience rekindled his love for this amazing country. So, when the opportunity arose the following year for him to relocate to Provence for a period, he jumped at the chance. Paul set up home in a cave-like dwelling in a tiny, picturesque town called Saint-Paul de Vence.

Reading this book I felt that I should have heard of Saint-Paul de Vence before, for it certainly is a gem. I loved reading the author’s vivid descriptions of its people and characters. I really enjoyed looking at the wonderful photographs which are scattered through the book and add so much to it. I have never been to Saint-Paul de Vence, but after reading this book I just know I will have to visit this exquisite town and see for myself the art galleries, museums, shops and of course, through this book, the now famous The Café de la Place. And, you never know, perhaps if I am lucky I may catch a game of pétanque.

When I was a child, my dad played bowls in the UK. Now living in France, I, in my ignorance, thought that the game I often see being played on sand rectangles and other surfaces was the same. Well not now, after reading this book, and the struggle that Paul Shore had just to be able to learn how to play it like a Frenchman does. Reading about the highs and lows of being part of a team, I am now totally in awe of this traditional French game.

I also learnt, that Saint-Paul de Vence is the place where the great impressionist painter Marc Chagall lived, worked, and died.  There’s lots about the artist in the book, and, and through the author’s wonderfully descriptive writing it is easy to see why he decided to live here.

Anyone who has moved to another country knows how difficult it is to make new friends, especially if there is a language barrier to contend with. However, I take my hat off to Paul, he did it, broke through the aloof French character and truly became accepted, not French, but accepted.

This book is a thoroughly enjoyable read. Through the chronicles of a year in the life of the author, a year which changed him, and his outlook on life as he grew to love the French relaxed attitude, it’s clear that as with all catalysts, it made him the man he is today.

Uncorked by Paul Shore is available from Amazon

Related Articles

Le Mot Juste: How to Impress Tout le Monde with Your French

Le Mot Juste: How to Impress Tout le Monde with Your French A tiny but fabulous book of words – French words. The sort of words that roll of the tongue and sound delicious, romantic and so… well French! Imogen Fortes has pulled together a list of fabulous French words that are used in every […]

Continue Reading

Finding Gilbert: A promise fulfilled by Diane Covington-Carter

This book is simply beautiful, within its pages are stories within stories, and they all began with an encounter between an American soldier and a little French boy in the months following the D-day landings on Omaha Beach, France, in June 1944. Finding Gilbert, a true story The soldier was the author’s father, Donald Kenneth […]

Continue Reading

Review of Montségur by Catherine de Courcy

History and drama fans will really enjoy this terrific blend of fact and fiction. Montségur by Catherine de Courcy starts in 1236 in southern France. Esme, a young forest child finds herself caught up in the frightening days of the inquisition. Raimond, her foster brother is taken by an inquisitor called Friar Pierre Tiquè and […]

Continue Reading

Review of Parallel Lives by Jennifer Andrewes

This book is simply un-put-downable. Whether like me you are an expat who loves reading about other regions of this amazing country, you love visiting France on holiday, are considering moving here, or you simply enjoy taking a wonderful fly-on-the-wall glimpse into other people’s lives, this book will keep you captivated until the very last […]

Continue Reading

Review of Paris Postcards by Guy Thomas Hibbert

In a series of short stories of love, life and Paris, Guy Hibbert’s eloquent writing portrays the pulse of the city and the lives and loves of some of its inhabitants over a century. Standalone stories but in some, their fates intertwine in a clever twist that gives the book a coherence you don’t often […]

Continue Reading

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Comments are closed.

Top