Liqueur 44 from Brittany (Bretagne)

Written by on May 23, 2012 in Wine and Drinks

Liqueur 44Many thanks to Colin Peake at The France Forum website for sending us recipe details of a traditional liqueur drink from Brittany, France. We looked it up and found that there are several variations of this amazing citrus alcohol liqueur and it’s so easy to make it would be a shame not to give it a go.

Colin at TFF says that it’s traditional to leave the jar you’re making the liqueur in on the table and when people come to visit you simply ladle them out a glass of the delicious orange or lemon based liqueur – we LOVE that idea and we are definitely going to do it – our French neighbours will be so impressed, actually every will be!

 

 

 

Recipe for Liqueur 44

You will need a 1½ litre kilner jar or similar with a tight screw top lid (one that you can get a whole orange into!)

1 large Orange or Lemon
1 litre of Alcohol (vodka is always good or the type of alcohol used sprecifically for pickling fruit)
44 sugar cubes (it doesn’t matter if brown or white, large or small cubes)
44 cubes of chocolate or 44 beans of coffee

Method

1. Place 44 sugar cubes in the bottom of the kilner jar

2. Stab the orange or lemon 44 times,

If you’re going the coffee way, insert a bean of coffee into each of the stabs in the orange or lemon. Put the orange or lemon into the jar on top of the sugar cubes, then pour the alcohol over and screw the lid on.

Leave the jar for 44 days (or longer if you want) in a cool dark place.  It’s traditional to not decant the drink but place it on the table in the jar, and use a “Louchette à sauce” to ladle it out into the glasses.  Or you can decant it into sterilised bottles cut the fruit into slices and insert into the bottles and keep them airtight.

If you’re using the chocolate method – leave out the coffee beans and add 44 small squares of chocolate on top of the sugar and then the fruit covered by alcohol.

Colin says that you can make the Chocolate 44 into a delicious spread! Warm the jar in hot water until the chocolate melts, shake the jar until it all mixes and becomes a smooth paste – sounds irresistible!

Note: Some people add two cloves to the mix to add depth/Some people add a vanilla pod for sweetness

Santé!

Related Articles

Visit Ruinart Reims – the oldest Champagne House in the world

Mark Twain, the great American writer was spot on when he claimed: “too much of anything is bad, but too much Champagne is just right”. Ever since it was “discovered” in France in the 17th century, just about everyone has fallen under the spell of the effervescent wine. It can only be made in Champagne, […]

Continue Reading

La Maison Noilly Prat Marseillan, France

La Maison Noilly Prat’s location is superb, next to Étang de Thau, a large lagoon in Marseillan, one of the oldest fishing villages in France. A few weathered bars, bistros and shops line the small multi-hued port. It’s a French Provencal postcard town come to life. The History of Noilly Prat Pascal, our guide, introduced […]

Continue Reading

The fascinating tale of Chartreuse liqueur

Legend has it (and who doesn’t love a good legend) that the only people who know the recipe and ingredients for the famous Chartreuse liqueur are two monks tucked away in a monastery in Voiron, not far from Grenoble. The 400 year old history of Chartreuse liqueur The liqueur (also known as the “Elixir of […]

Continue Reading

Guide to Calvados – the drink and the place

Calvados is both a place and a drink. It is a department that lies in the heart of Normandy and includes amongst its many jewels the pretty harbour town of Honfleur, swanky Deauville, and the port town of Caen, capital of Calvados as well as William the conqueror’s last home town. This area is known […]

Continue Reading

American craft beer finds favour in Paris

An elegant interior of marble fireplaces, ceiling high, gilt-edged mirrors, crystal chandeliers and ornate furniture formed an unlikely backdrop for a beer and food matching dinner with a twist.  This was no ordinary setting and no ordinary dinner!  The Brewers Association, a not-for-proft trade body representing small and independent American craft brewers, was the guest […]

Continue Reading

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Comments are closed.

Top