Labastide-d’Armagnac Gascony, Landes

Written by on April 30, 2018 in Midi-Pyrénées

Gascony entered recorded history during the reign of Julius Caesar as the core territory of Roman Aquitania. Its fertile soil was nourished by the rivers descending from the Pyrénées to the plains below.

In his memoir, Caesar described the machinations occurring during his nine years of fighting the Gauls, an alliance of nine tribes which included the Vascones. The Vascones defined a confederacy of non-Romanised tribes who inhabited both sides of the Pyrénées and shared common traditions. By the late 6th century several of their tribes moved north, over the Pyrénées, and down into the territory they called Vasconia, which now comprises the seven departments in southwestern France called Gascony. The remaining portion in Spain became the Basque Country.

Labastide-Armagnac medieval charm by the bucket load

Founded in 1291, when Gascony still belonged to England, Labastide-d’Armagnac is the most charming, medieval village in the Landes department. Place Royale, its main arcaded square, is said to be the model for the Place des Vosges in Paris, commissioned by Henri IV. When I visit there, I always feel as if I’ve stepped onto a Hollywood movie set and you can easily be a flâneur* here. The most prominent feature of the Place Royal is the elegant church, Notre-Dame de Labastide, while a visit to the Bar Tortoré, the oldest bar in the region, offers a chance to rub shoulders with the locals.

Labastide-d’Armagnac is the annual venue for the Armagnac Festival which takes place the last weekend in October. Considered the nectar of the gods and superior to Cognac, Armagnac is showcased in all of its vintages throughout the Place Royale. For a few euros, you can purchase an empty glass and taste your way around the square. As the locals enthuse, “Wine is the only thing that makes us happy as adults for no reason”.

More on Gascony

The historic and pretty town of Bazas in the Gironde
What to see and do in Lectoure Gers Occitanie
Take a tour of gastronomic Gascony and discover foodie paradise

Sue Aran is a local guide and expert on the area: www.FrenchCountryAdventures.com

Read the expert’s guide to Gascony in the Autumn issue of The Good Life France Magazine which is free to read online, download and subscribe to.

Related Articles

Where to eat out near Millau Viaduct Aveyron

Close to the awesome Millau Viaduct, and providing a surreal backdrop),is the ancient town of Millau. It’s home to a rich history and beautiful architecture, Roman pottery and fine leather glove making. It’s a pretty town and also a good place to stop off to enjoy a leisurely bite to eat and enjoy the stunning […]

Continue Reading

10 things to do in Toulouse

10 things to do in Toulouse

Written by on November 16, 2018 in Midi-Pyrénées

Toulouse is around 60 miles from the  Spanish border and its sunny neighbour definitely influences the flavour of this vibrant city. From lively bistros and bodegas in elegant squares to a penchant for tango dancing and al fresco dining, lively Toulouse is a great place for a city break. There’s plenty to do and see […]

Continue Reading

Discover Aveyron France | Pickled in the past

Aveyron echoes with the past. Every densely wooded gorge and valley, every ancient bastide town and every winding road seems to whisper of pilgrims making their weary way south, of Romans and rebellious Gauls or of Knights Templars, thundering across the plateaux. Part of the Massif Central but also the northern most part of the […]

Continue Reading

Toulouse for foodies | Where to eat out in Toulouse

Toulouse has a reputation for being friendly and sunny, perfect conditions to take advantage of all that’s on offer. It’s also famous for its great food from cassoulet to markets and gastronomic restaurants. Lip-smacking Cassoulet The spicy, meaty, unctuous and utterly mouth-watering stew with haricot beans is one of the most famous specialities of the […]

Continue Reading

A glimpse of the future at the Millau Viaduct  Aveyron France

The river and gorges of the Tarn are well known and undoubtedly it’s worth losing yourself for a while here in what is the deepest canyon in France. But this really is a place where the vastness of nature meets the enormity of human creation. And, if the Pont du Gard transports you back to […]

Continue Reading

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Comments are closed.

Top