How to make Eiffel Tower Biscuits

Written by on December 26, 2020 in Desserts

Eiffel Tower shaped biscuits

Eiffel Tower biscuits are easy to make. Great for making an impression, sharing and hanging from Christmas trees! And if you really want to make them pretty – add some “stained glass” detail…

Ingredients for Eiffel Tower biscuits

1 cup/226g unsalted butter
1 cup/200g granulated sugar4 cups/480g all-purpose plain flour
½ cup/65g corn powder
2 eggs
¾ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Eiffel Tower Cookie cutter. They’re easily available on line or download a plain drawing from the internet and use it as a stencil to cut out your shape.

“Stained glass”

10-12 hard boiled sweets – coloured ones are best

Ribbon – if hanging them on the tree

Directions

Sift the flour, corn powder and salt into a large bowl and whisk together.

In a mixer with a paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar.

Add the eggs one at a time, then the vanilla while still mixing on low.

Scrape the sides of the bowl down and add the dry mixture. Mix together for 2-3 minutes making sure it’s all combined.

Split the dough into two pieces and roll out into about ¼ inch thick circles.

Wrap in cling film and chill for an hour. The dough is easier to work with when its chilled.

Cut into the shapes you want, then using a smaller cutter, cut out a part of the centre for the “stained glass”.

Poke a small hole at the top of the cookie, for the ribbon to go through if you are hanging them. Place them onto a parchment lined baking tray.

Put the hard boiled sweets into a bag and using a rolling pin crush the sweets until they are like powder. Add it to the middle of the biscuits.

Bake for 12 minutes at 375 F/ 180 C, until golden.

Leave for 2-3 minutes before moving to a cooling rack to allow the candy to set.

Once cooled, add a loop of ribbon to the top.

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