How tax for families in France plays a big part in life

Written by on August 16, 2018 in Guest Blogs, Living in France

In France everything has its season: in February it’s skiing; in May it’s lily-of-the valley; in August it’s idleness; and in October it’s tax. This last is why, as the leaves begin to fall each year, my husband and I get together for a financial summit.

Our budgetary discussions have a peculiarly French flavour, however: rather than generating spreadsheets and instigating household economies, we hold our annual discussion about whether or not we should have a third child.

Tax is a family affair in France

In the UK, our third child discussions were all about affordability. A third child meant maternity leave, a bigger car, an extra mouth to feed, and a third winter coat each year. Could our finances stretch that far, we asked ourselves? In France, our conversations on the subject take precisely the opposite course, for it seems that if French Presidents have one objective in mind it is that I should procreate. No, calmez-vous, there is no need for another sleaze probe: Governmental interests in this area are fiscal rather than prurient in nature.

French families get to share their tax liabilities between them, you see. This does not mean a stingy little contribution via the child benefit system (though French families get that too), but a wholesale division of the family’s tax liabilities between each member of the family. Thus, the more numerous the family, the smaller the bill. Whereas the super-rich in the UK are busy messing around with offshore bank accounts and dodgy investment funds, here in France, where all you have to do is go forth and multiply, tax avoidance is much more fun.

Child tax benefits in France

A third child would not only reduce our tax liability by 25% but would transform us into a card-carrying famille nombreuse. Entire websites are given over to the privileges enjoyed by such families, which include state-subsidised reductions of up to 75% in the cost of train tickets, reduced entries to museums, cinemas and leisure centres, and even, in some resorts, free ski passes for the fifth family member (lest the cost of the compulsory February activity become prohibitive). In addition to virtually non-existent childcare costs and government-sponsored rehabilitation of mothers’ baby-making equipment, reproduction in France has much to recommend it.

What being a mother means in France

Of course, to benefit from the munificence of the French state, one has not only to give birth to additional children, but to remain in France. Prospective parents might do well to think this through before they embark on any course of action. Not only does raising a family in France commit you to a lifetime of being corrected on the use of the subjonctif by young relatives barely out of nappies, it also means that your children will demand at least three courses, one of which should be fromage, at every meal. You will tie yourself in to years of rote-learned poetry: charming when it is directed towards your many and manifold virtues on Mother’s Day, but rather less so when you are hearing a child drone on about the rentrée for the fifth time in their primary school career. You will have to learn to decipher that French curly script, le cursive, if you ever want to stand a chance of understanding a word that your child writes, and if they show the slightest glimmer of musical talent, you will become as expert as Julie Andrews on the subject of the gender of deer, or how far to run.

In other words, the reduction in your tax bill comes at a price, which is why at our annual summit we postponed any decision until next year…

Emily Commander is a freelance writer and journalist who lives in Lyon and blogs about the peculiarities of French life. You can find her at www.lostinlyon.com

Related Articles

Discovering the lavender fields of Provence in Sault

The chances are that if you visit Provence from mid-June to mid-August – you have lavender on your mind and in your sights. Though Provence is well known for the fragrant purple blooms, it is not grown in abundance throughout the whole of Provence, though you will find fields of the purple blooms during your […]

Continue Reading

How a father’s tale of Normandy in WWII inspired a book

You could say that my love affair with France and passion for the French language began in earnest, when, at age eleven, I heard French spoken, loving the soft, musical and even sensual sounds that floated into my ears. But the truth is that the story began before I was born, when my father landed […]

Continue Reading

A Quiet Retirement in France? 

A Quiet Retirement in France? 

Written by on September 10, 2018 in Guest Blogs

One evening a few years ago my wife and I overheard several tales of woe that almost made us re-think our plans to buy a house in France. We were on a golf break in Le Perche, Normandy, staying at a lovely hotel with a fantastic restaurant. One evening, after our eighteen holes we went […]

Continue Reading

France marks the Centenary of the British Royal Air Force

April 1, 2018 marked the first hundred years since the creation of the British Royal Air Force. The combining of the Royal Naval Air Service and the Army’s Royal Flying Corps into a new service took place at St. Omer aerodrome in Nord, pas de Calais as the Great War was approaching its close. The […]

Continue Reading

St Remy de Provence, a perfect holiday destination

Provence in summer… the aroma of warm baguettes and the fragrance of the Lavender that is in vibrant bloom in July lingers on your senses. Our family first stumbled upon this region in the south of france as part of a business trip over a decade ago. Speaking very little French and understanding even less, […]

Continue Reading

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Comments are closed.

Top