Liqueur 44 from Brittany (Bretagne)

Written by on May 23, 2012 in Wine and Drinks

Liqueur 44Many thanks to Colin Peake at The France Forum website for sending us recipe details of a traditional liqueur drink from Brittany, France. We looked it up and found that there are several variations of this amazing citrus alcohol liqueur and it’s so easy to make it would be a shame not to give it a go.

Colin at TFF says that it’s traditional to leave the jar you’re making the liqueur in on the table and when people come to visit you simply ladle them out a glass of the delicious orange or lemon based liqueur – we LOVE that idea and we are definitely going to do it – our French neighbours will be so impressed, actually every will be!




Recipe for Liqueur 44

You will need a 1½ litre kilner jar or similar with a tight screw top lid (one that you can get a whole orange into!)

1 large Orange or Lemon
1 litre of Alcohol (vodka is always good or the type of alcohol used sprecifically for pickling fruit)
44 sugar cubes (it doesn’t matter if brown or white, large or small cubes)
44 cubes of chocolate or 44 beans of coffee


1. Place 44 sugar cubes in the bottom of the kilner jar

2. Stab the orange or lemon 44 times,

If you’re going the coffee way, insert a bean of coffee into each of the stabs in the orange or lemon. Put the orange or lemon into the jar on top of the sugar cubes, then pour the alcohol over and screw the lid on.

Leave the jar for 44 days (or longer if you want) in a cool dark place.  It’s traditional to not decant the drink but place it on the table in the jar, and use a “Louchette à sauce” to ladle it out into the glasses.  Or you can decant it into sterilised bottles cut the fruit into slices and insert into the bottles and keep them airtight.

If you’re using the chocolate method – leave out the coffee beans and add 44 small squares of chocolate on top of the sugar and then the fruit covered by alcohol.

Colin says that you can make the Chocolate 44 into a delicious spread! Warm the jar in hot water until the chocolate melts, shake the jar until it all mixes and becomes a smooth paste – sounds irresistible!

Note: Some people add two cloves to the mix to add depth/Some people add a vanilla pod for sweetness


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